Report Card: Git Essential Training on Lynda

When leading teams of architects and sellers in preparing complex proposals, one of my frequent headaches was version control.  The Architects understand version control, but typically bring different personal techniques.  God bless the Sellers, but they frequently just couldn’t see why we all couldn’t just keep revising the same file and naming it the same thing.  I’m excited to finally get to learn about this popular important tool for version control for small to medium-sized projects.  (The threshold for “large” in project size is always a subjective matter until you are working with one of the giants.)

I just completed the Git Essential Training class on Lynda.com and I recommend this on-line class.

Kevin Scoglund has done a good job here.  The lectures are flawlessly delivered.  His diction is so clear that it is possible to accelerate the delivery rate to 1.5x and still clearly understand what is being presented.  The on-screen time is 100% focused on the Git tool, with excellent use of pointers, highlighting, and other visual cues.  (I believe too many on-line classes waste screen time showing the presenter blather away in a poorly prepared “studio” space.)

This course focuses on using Git from the command line, and using only Git (not GitHub.) It makes sense to me to thoroughly understand Git before moving forward on understanding the deeper parts of GitHub.  The course uses an example web development project as the training material.  The course provides the files and directories for the project.

The course uses what I would call the “Tell, Show, and Follow” method.  For each topic, there is a video lecture telling the importance of a specific scenario or technique, including a demonstration of the technique.  The student can then re-enact the same technique (with variations) on their own computer using the project files provided.

The course incorporated 6 and a half hours of video in 88 lectures to thoroughly cover the material.

This course has no final exams, grades, or certifications.


(Image courtesy of jarmoluk at Pixabay)

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