My Favorite Python References

Here are some references I’ve found particularly useful when developing or debugging Python code.  When trying something new, I like to have a user’s guide open at my left elbow, a language reference guide open at my right elbow, and a cup of dark coffee steaming above the keyboard.  When debugging, I like to have a debugger reference on the left, and a large unloaded revolver at my right.  (The bugs find the revolver intimidating, and I find that snapping sound more rewarding than admitting my programming errors.)

Python User’s Guides

These focus on techniques for using specific methods.  They are generally stronger than beginner’s introductions.

https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/index.html

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Python_Programming

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Non-Programmer%27s_Tutorial_for_Python_3

Python Reference Guides

These provide encyclopedic reference on the details of function and syntax.

Language Reference:

https://docs.python.org/3/reference/index.html#reference-index

Library Reference:

https://docs.python.org/3/library/index.html

Python Style Guides

These provide some best practices on structuring the code.

https://google.github.io/styleguide/pyguide.html

https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/

http://deeplearning.net/software/pylearn/v2_planning/API_coding_style.html

https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0257/

Python Glossary

https://docs.python.org/3/glossary.html#glossary

Python Cookbooks

http://pythonexcels.com/python-excel-mini-cookbook/

Python Tutorials

The better organized on-line tutorials easily serve as user’s guides.

https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/

https://www.tutorialspoint.com/python/

https://www.learnpython.org/

Humor

https://www.python.org/doc/humor/


(Image courtesy of Phil Bird at FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

Advertisements